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[HanCinema's Drama Review] "Entourage" Episode 9

2016/12/03 | 918 views | Permalink

Yeong-bin is going through a major crisis and being the spoiled man-baby that he is, he drags everyone down with him. His friends and agent try to understand while making the best out of the situation, but his participation in the film and his career are in danger. In light of these events, Joon feels even more pressure about succeeding with his new variety show gig and helping out.

Before getting to the bane of everyone's existence that is Yeong-bin (Seo Kang-joon) I have to say I am more than thankful to see Joon (Lee Kwang-soo) and Turtle (Lee Dong-hwi) considering their possible future responsibilities should Yeong-bin's career go south. They have gone from immature freeloading cartoons to somewhat human by viewing things as the adults that they are and this development could not have come too soon. This is at least a nice break from their "comedy".

Joon and Turtle worrying about Yeong-bin's careerYeong-bin trying to have some time alone

Coming back to the aforementioned man-baby, the episode makes an effort to portray Yeong-bin's pain and the loneliness of a star with few people to confide in. Unfortunately, neither his character or his past with So-hee (Ahn So-hee) have been developed enough for this brief, one-episode focus on these topics to make him more sympathetic as he tramples on everyone who has to work with him as the bread-maker. Seo Kang-joon looks as tired of this stagnancy in his character as I am at this point as well.

One of the many problems with "Entourage" is that it clearly wants to create the character conflicts and drama that Korean series are so keen on, but it does not really want to create a plot to support this drama. At least not one that fits the length of the story it provides. The characters are like flies, throwing themselves at a glass window over and over and over again without making progress due to their confines.

Ho-jin and Yeong-bin talking about their argumentEun-gap and Se-na

Eun-gap's (Cho Jin-woong) story has a much smaller focus in this episode, but the lack of impact from Yeong-bin's actions on a wider scale is the bigger problem. In its effort to make him a tad bit likable, the plot seems to be avoiding the fact that many careers will be in trouble if a big project is delayed. Other characters avoid reminding him of this responsibility past their small circle as well.

This is a wasted opportunity to shine light on the less glamorous, less powerful figures of entertainment making. We have not really seen the stories or struggles of more minor cast and crew members. Eun-gap's story is the closest we get, but with the focus shifting to Yeong-bin's ego, I wonder if they will see it through to its end.

"Entourage" is directed by Jang Yeong-woo, written by Kwon So-ra and Seo Jae-won and features Cho Jin-woong, Seo Kang-joon, Lee Kwang-soo, Park Jung-min and Lee Dong-hwi.

Written by: Orion from 'Orion's Ramblings'

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