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[HanCinema's Drama Review] "Save Me" Episode 6

2017/08/21 | 621 views | Permalink

The world of "Save Me" may be cruel, but our fighters for justice are starting to take form. The appearance of new characters and the continued development of established ones creates suspense over who will be an enemy of our heroes and who an ally. The bigger Guseonwon gets, the more people start wondering about it.

Sang-hwan's (Ok Taecyeon) father seems to be the center of the aforementioned new characters and their stories. He clearly has a bone to pick with Lee  Jin-seok and his boss, as seen in the previous episode. Did he really order Dong-cheol's (Woo Do-hwan) murder? It is the darker nuances of him that really captivate me that is largely thanks to Son Byung-ho. He shows us a man who seems to care about his son at times, but who is also dangerous and potentially villainous.

Yong-min skinning his preyKang-soo taking notes on disappearances

His evolving darkness reminds us that Muji lacks some decent older adults and I am curious about who is a potential ally. After all, a hero does not always appear as a knight in shining armor. Could detective Lee Kang-soo (Jang Hyuk-jin) become a force for good despite his willingness to work for personal gain? Could Cha Joon-goo (Go Joon) be a former gangster out for revenge and still be someone who will save lives? I would love to see some of these flawed people become beacons of hope in this dark town.

Still, I am not holding my breath for any major heroics from such characters anytime soon and so I find it imperative that Sang-mi (Seo Ye-ji) learns how to beat the cult at its own game for now. The unholy trinity of Guseonwon rely on deceit and unless she wants to end up restrained as a supposed mental patient, she will need to use that against them. It will take Sang-mi's help from within as much as the efforts of outsiders to take them down.

Jin-seok and Joon-gooDong-cheol trying to protect a victim of abuse

Those outsiders will need more support, however. While I am not convinced that Detective Lee is our help on the side of the law, I do believe Dong-cheol will be the one who brings physical fighting to the battle. In keeping with the drama's realistic characters, however, even this kind soul is flawed. The man has still not learned that brute force can do more harm than good for all involved.

"Save Me" has been doing very well with its gruesome and relentlessly packed plot, but I feel the little breather that episode six provides from the preceding suffering is a good idea. We are a third into a very dark story and most viewers likely need some glimmer of hope and forward movement in the rescuing department to keep going. I cannot wait to see the tables turned on Guseonwon.

"Save Me" is directed by Kim Seong-soo, written by Jeong Sin-gyoo and Jeong I-do-I and features Ok Taecyeon, Seo Ye-ji, Jo Sung-ha and Woo Do-hwan.

Written by: Orion from 'Orion's Ramblings'

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